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  American Autumn Shishapangma Expedition 2005


Sunset on Shishapangma from Base Camp

 

Final Planning

 

Our team climb of Mount Rainier's Liberty Ridge over July 4 weekend went very well.  We summited without problem, got to know one another, and even found we enjoyed each other's company (good thing!).  Of course we were all on our best behavior...

 

Cho Oyo is a go!  David Christopher arranged transportation from Shishapangma base camp to Cho Oyo, and we'll use only Dorje, the cook to support us at base camp.  Pratap, the sirdar, will travel to Kathmandu with Eric who's sightseeing and not climbing Cho Oyo.  We other three plan on a rapid ascent, moving to a higher a camp each day.  We've added another ten days to the schedule to attempt a second 8000m peak!

 

The last few weeks has been about as hectic as could be anticipated, with the biggest headache that two of our four visas were denied by the Chinese government. Val and Eric used the Chicago consulate, who issued their visas without problem.

 

Going to Tibet requires extra permission, which we have, but will only receive the entry permits once we land in China.  We found out the standard method of getting to Tibet is to leave it completely off the visa application - that it's easy to get the permit from the tour operator once inside China, but virtually impossible to get a visa clear to Tibet.  So Dave's and Monty's visas were denied, not only for lack of permission but Dave's was also denied because the Chinese Embassy in Washington required originals, not faxes.

 

Using friends and new paperwork sent from Beijing, we've been told just yesterday that our visas WILL be issued - with one week until departure! The other thing the Chinese did at the last minute is increase the amount of money they require by almost $5000 (grrr...).  David

 

Christopher negotiated that down to $3200, but they refuse to answer what (if anything) the extra charges are for.

 

We've broken out planning responsibilities as follows:

 

Gear - Dave

Food - Valerie

Technology - Eric

Finance - Monty

 

Each has been planning their area and updating each other at weekly conference calls.

 

It's one week to go, and everything looks like it's in order.  Now just

have to get packed!

 

The last area that cannot be passed over without mention is David

Christopher's help in setting up all the logistics.  David's a retired

travel agent with expertise in this area of the world, and he did all

our logistics for Ama Dablam last year.  He's hired our sirdar and cook, made all our travel arrangements, obtained all the in-country gear, obtained the climbing permits for both mountains, negotiated with the Chinese Mountaineering Association - the list just goes on and on!  With the compressed timeline, changes, and geographically dispersed group, this trip has been the most difficult he's ever arranged, yet he continues with endless patience.  He's done it all as a gratis service for the Mazamas, the Portland mountaineering club that Monty, the climb leader, belongs to. David, we're not exaggerating when we say we couldn't do it without you!

 

--Monty

Updates

 

Millet One Sport Everest Boot  has made some minor changes by adding more Kevlar. USES Expeditions / High altitude / Mountaineering in extremely cold conditions / Isothermal to -75°F Gore-Tex® Top dry / Evazote Reinforcements with aramid threads. Avg. Weight: 5 lbs 13 oz Sizes: 5 - 14 DESCRIPTION Boot with semi-rigid shell and built-in Gore-Tex® gaiter reinforced by aramid threads, and removable inner slipper Automatic crampon attachment Non-compressive fastening Double zip, so easier to put on Microcellular midsole to increase insulation Removable inner slipper in aluminized alveolate Fiberglass and carbon footbed Cordura + Evazote upper Elasticated collar.

Expedition footwear for mountaineering in conditions of extreme cold.  NOTE US SIZES LISTED. See more here.

A cold weather, high altitude double boot for extreme conditions The Olympus Mons is the perfect choice for 8000-meter peaks. This super lightweight double boot has a PE thermal insulating inner boot that is coupled with a thermo-reflective outer boot with an integrated gaiter. We used a super insulating lightweight PE outsole to keep the weight down and the TPU midsole is excellent for crampon compatibility and stability on steep terrain. WEIGHT: 39.86 oz • 1130 g LAST: Olympus Mons CONSTRUCTION: Inner: Slip lasted Outer: Board Lasted OUTER BOOT: Cordura® upper lined with dual-density PE micro-cellular thermal insulating closed cell foam and thermo-reflective aluminium facing/ Insulated removable footbed/ Vibram® rubber rand See more here.

 

 

 

 

 




 

 

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