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  HI-TEC & High Point Expedition Dhaulagiri 2006 news


Dhaulaghiri  – Base camp: Hi there, here we are in the “comfort” of the base camp again.  Our friend Ruda is very exhausted and he would like to escape back to the safety of the civilization.  I am not really surprised about that.  The differences in living qualities between camps are really great, almost incomparable.  We can finally change our clothes after a many days of usage.  Finally we also change our shoes.  The plastic, sweaty boots that we wear for many days are switched for much more comfortable HI-TEC sandals during the day or winter shoes in the evening.   We are still camping on the glacier that is why we need winter shoes.  Now I can finally write thanks to the guys from MOD ELECTRONIC.  They solved our situation with the solar and Kamil completed our electric system so we could charge batteries.   

Anyway, now I will tell you little bit more information about the climb.  From the beginning was necessary to climb through at least 150 m of incredibly difficult condition of an icefall.  That climb took more than 2 hours.  It felt like when you try to run cross the street on the red light.  In next hour we walked under the north wall of Dhaulaghiri, where we could see an open valley with many breaches. 

The weather was so hot there that it even burned Kamil’s and Roman’s thighs after they open their pans for a little bit of suntan.  Thanks to the practice of a previous climb in this weather and conditions that can occur, we knew that we had to wear white thermo cloths from CRAFT and a white hat with a cloth pull down to the neck.  Not everybody had this outfit and who had only a black T-shirt would rather wish to be in the hell.    

Next part we came along a slope, where the steepness grew rapidly.  Right above the slope was a large irregularity of glacial ice called ‘serac’, where we traversed and finally reached another camp CI.  That camp was built one day before we arrived by the Swedish group of climbers I mentioned before.  Their first tent was destroyed thanks to an avalanche that came down one day before.  While we traversed, we noticed where exactly they tried to find their camp, unfortunately without any success.   

The weather changed to worse very quickly.  Our pack carriers run away due to this weather condition.  It snowed at least 1m of snow up there.  Fortunately most of the snow subsided pretty fast.   

By then we climbed over 1km and except our total exhaustion we were also extremely dehydrated.  While I thought we had a plenty of water with us my friends informed me that we have to stop and cook some more snow and find a proper place for a tent.  They took with them about 1 liter of water lesser than me. The weather also changed very quickly.   

In the snow we made a platform to cook.  I continued to search for a good place to build a tent.  It was very difficult to get oriented in the fag.  I couldn’t recognize what was flat hill area and where breaches in the avalanche started.  The weather condition didn’t allow me to search enough and I had to return back to my friends.  They cooked a tea while I was gone.  After we finished a soup we decided to move at least to the place that seamed to me a little bit more protected against a wind and with a least amount of snow.   

The time ran fast and we built a tent between breaches in the snow.  We should be in the height of 5 600m by now.  It looked like we managed to climb about 1 200m of height.  I believe that it was a great performance.  Finally we cooked plenty of water for another day. It is time to go sleep.  Good night! Radek Jaros

Millet One Sport Everest Boot  has made some minor changes by adding more Kevlar. USES Expeditions / High altitude / Mountaineering in extremely cold conditions / Isothermal to -75°F Gore-Tex® Top dry / Evazote Reinforcements with aramid threads. Avg. Weight: 5 lbs 13 oz Sizes: 5 - 14 DESCRIPTION Boot with semi-rigid shell and built-in Gore-Tex® gaiter reinforced by aramid threads, and removable inner slipper Automatic crampon attachment Non-compressive fastening Double zip, so easier to put on Microcellular midsole to increase insulation Removable inner slipper in aluminized alveolate Fiberglass and carbon footbed Cordura + Evazote upper Elasticated collar.

Expedition footwear for mountaineering in conditions of extreme cold.  NOTE US SIZES LISTED. See more here.

A cold weather, high altitude double boot for extreme conditions The Olympus Mons is the perfect choice for 8000-meter peaks. This super lightweight double boot has a PE thermal insulating inner boot that is coupled with a thermo-reflective outer boot with an integrated gaiter. We used a super insulating lightweight PE outsole to keep the weight down and the TPU midsole is excellent for crampon compatibility and stability on steep terrain. WEIGHT: 39.86 oz • 1130 g LAST: Olympus Mons CONSTRUCTION: Inner: Slip lasted Outer: Board Lasted OUTER BOOT: Cordura® upper lined with dual-density PE micro-cellular thermal insulating closed cell foam and thermo-reflective aluminium facing/ Insulated removable footbed/ Vibram® rubber rand See more here.

 

 

 

 

 




 

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