Home
   Today's News
   8000 Meters Facts
  
Banners Ads
   Bookstore
   Classified Ads
   Climb for Peace
  
Contact

   Downloads
  
Educational
  
Expeditions
  
Facts
  
Games
  
Gear
  
History
  
Interviews

   Mailing List
   Media

   Medical
  
News (current)
   News Archives
   Sat Phones
   Search
   Seven Summits
   Snowboard
   Speakers
   Students
   Readers Guide
   Risks

   Trip Reports
   Visitor Agreement

   Volunteer/help

 

    
  

 

  




  Expedice HI-TEC V-LITE Nanga Parbat - K2 2005: Rescue on the Killer Mountain


Update: “The Killer Mountain” – this name sounded in our ears all the way from Islamabad to the BC. Yesterday, June 18, we planned a day of a rest. In our bodies, we still felt the 16+ hours of the previous day’s climb from the BC to C2 – in a raging thunder storm all the way up through the Kinsshofer Wall  [My report of yesterday] -- and back to the BC in a single day. A day off would have been well deserved. Well, life meant otherwise...

By now, there are about 20 climbers in the BC.  No other expedition has been above C1 as yet. Quite surprisingly, it looks like there is just one high-altitude porter among all the climbers, quite a difference, as compared to the Everest!  Among them, our friend Ivan Vallejo, who summited Shishapangma a day after us last fall.

It is the afternoon,  I am relaxing in my tent, doing my English lessons, when I notice an unusual fuss.  Petr and I get out of our tents and go to check out what is happening. A piece of ice fell on a tent at C1. A girl has been injured, it looks like a crushed pelvis, she will need to be carried down on a stretcher. In a hurry, we throw our most necessary climbing stuff to a backpack, several groups are already on their way to up to the C1, others are already fixing a stretcher out of tent poles.  When it is ready, Ivan tries to take it under his arm... if he only knew, how the path over the glacier looks like and that it takes good three hours to get to the C1. I have the stretcher fixed on my backpack. We leave the BC as the last ones, but after three ascents to the C2 the acclimatization shows. I reach C1 just at the dusk. Their tent is about 5m apart from ours and more exposed than ours. I look at the girl, she is beautiful. She has already got a shot and so there is a smile on her face.   Perhaps because she sees the stretcher. She is in a sleeping bag, wrapped in foam pads, well fixed and bound by ropes. The stretcher will be needed only past the glacier, lowering on ropes comes first. Sixteen climbers collaborate in the efforts, Spaniards, Japanese, French, Ecuadorian, Swiss, Czechs. Before the BC, Pakistani join. In the melting snow, sinking waistline-deep, the progress is excruciating.  We rotate often, every ones a while some one falls apart completely exhausted. The weather forecast fulfills, and we are caught by a snow storm, in lower parts changing into a rain. Getting over the crevasse part is a real topper! Everybody is so overwhelmed and exhausted that no one seems to even think about the risks. The dark is merciful. The girl groans, but she is brave. After another shot, the smile returns on her face.  At the end of the glacier, the stretcher comes to use. The path goes through a horrible terrain, carriers rotate regularly, if one sinks deep into the snow, another climber rushes to take over.  Not a single time she fell out of the stretcher!!!  It is 10PM when I am telling her: this is the last 100 meters. In a few minutes we cautiously lay her down in the Spanish tent. When I am leaving, she catches my hand and whispers thanks. I clasp her hand, stroke her face and after a month I am giving a kiss to a women. For a courage. Hers ... or mine?

Radek Jaros, Nanga Parbat BC, June 18, 2005

Note: The family is aware of the accident, the news was held until after they were notified...

Updates

 

Millet One Sport Everest Boot Expedition and mountaineering boot for high altitude and extremely cold conditions. The Everest has conquered all 14 mountains over 8,000m and also the Seven Summits- and has now had a makeover to ensure continued peak preformance. With a newer sung, Alpine Fit, and even lighter Expedition footwear for mountaineering in conditions of extreme cold.  NOTE US SIZES LISTED. See more here.

 




 

 

Altitude pre-
  
acclimatization

   Ascenders

   Atlas snowshoes

   Black Diamond

   Botas

   Brunton

   Carabiners

   CaVa Climbing Shoes
   Clearance

   Clif Bar

   Cloudveil

   CMI

   Crampons

   Edelweiss ropes
  
Eureka Tents

   Featured

   FoxRiver

   Garmin

   Granite Gear

   Harnesses
   Headlamps
   Helmets

   HighGear
   Ice Axes

   Kavu Eyewear

   Katadyn

   Kelty

   Kong

   Lekisport

   Lowepro

   Motorola

   Mountain Hardwear

   Mountainsmith

   MSR

   Nalgene

   New England Ropes

   Nikwax

   Omega

   Patagonia

   Pelican

   Petzl

   PowerBar

   Princeton Tec

   Prescription Glacier

   Glasses

   Primus

   Rope Bags

   Seattle Sports

   Serius
  
Sleeping Bags

   Stubai

   Suunto

   Tents

   Thermarest

   Trango

   Tool Logic

   Trekking Poles
   Yaktrax
  
and more here

 



  



Send email to  • Copyright© 1998-2014  EverestNews.com
All rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
Disclaimer, Privacy Policy, Visitor Agreement, Legal Notes: Read it