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  SummitClimb Cho Oyu Autumn 2006: The weird life inside the Ring


 

The Ring Road is a 21 km road circling the city of Kathmandu. This has become an important landmark as of late. The curfews have been almost exclusive to those of us, inside the Ring, and we have heard of a planned large scale protest for tomorrow with upwards of a million people, around the Ring. Yet, here inside the Ring, life is relatively straightforward. Restaurants with limited menus, cut off cell phone service, and everpresent military guards passing the time smoking on the streets are the norm.

The scene changes dramatically along the areas of protest. Every morning we wake eager to hear what the situation is and read about the injuries involved at the fringe of the Ring. This place is full of contrast now. A scene from the ride in the other day sticks with me.... as political turmoil heated up in various parts of the city, we passed the pool area of a nice hotel surrounded by gardens complete with foriegn tourists laying out and drinking in the sun. A hundred yards away you see a trash pile collecting from countless days, with a cow standing in the middle of it. In the Kathmandu Post, over coffee, reading of 3 more deaths just a few blocks away, and in the next column "Celebrity Birthdays," to find out that it is Aaron Comess' the drummer of The Spin Doctors 38th Birthday! Cheers. 

So the contrasts continue, as we tentatively plan on taking yet another now routine helicopter ride from here to the Tibetan border, driving seems highly unlikely, a random German tourist sitting directly next to me at the internet cafe is reading my last dispatch from this very trip a few days ago on everestnews...it certainly is weird inside the Ring.

We will wait until tomorrow when the rest of our team members arrive, have our final days of preparation and hoepfully break out of the Ring..........

Bueno Suerte,

Ryan

Dispatches

Background: Introduction to Cho Oyu: Cho-Oyu has only recently become a popular mountain to climb.  It is now known to be one of the most accessible of the world’s fourteen 8,000 metre mountains.  This is because the ascent to the summit is short and direct, with a few small technical sections, less than 6 metres high, climbed in safety using fixed lines. Additionally, the mountain can be easily reached by four-wheel-drive vehicle, and the trail to Camp 1 at 6,400 metres, is basically a steep walk on talus slopes, often done in hiking boots.  This expedition to Cho-Oyu maximizes our previous successful ascents on the peak itself, plus many years of accumulated wisdom of the high Himalaya, a strong record of reaching 8,000 metre summits in all safety, along with an intimate knowledge of the Tibetan and Chinese officials who regulate the permit system.  We must also give credit to the highly experienced and hard-working leaders, sherpas and staff here at SummitClimb.com

Leader: Ryan Waters, an accomplished and friendly leader

Cho Oyu - the "Turquoise Goddess" in Tibetan - is located at the frontier of Tibet and Nepal. At a height of 8201 meters, it belongs to the Himalayan range, about 30 km west of Everest. It is the sixth highest mountain in the world and was first climbed on October 19th 1954 by the Austrian Herbert Tichy, with Sepp Jochler and Pasang Dava Lama.

"Finally, the peak is reached, the infinite hardships are ended. The last nine hours fighting with the mountain; the time in the death zone above 24,000 foot, the weeks of privations and hardships, even the risk of one's life - is this reward itself really? Yes, certainly! Not because of fame but inner satisfaction: To have found the mountain as friend and have been so near to the sky." Sepp Jochler.

 

Millet One Sport Everest Boot Expedition and mountaineering boot for high altitude and extremely cold conditions. The Everest has conquered all 14 mountains over 8,000m and also the Seven Summits- and has now had a makeover to ensure continued peak preformance. With a newer sung, Alpine Fit, and even lighter Expedition footwear for mountaineering in conditions of extreme cold.  NOTE US SIZES LISTED. See more here.

 

A cold weather, high altitude double boot for extreme conditions The Olympus Mons is the perfect choice for 8000-meter peaks. This super lightweight double boot has a PE thermal insulating inner boot that is coupled with a thermo-reflective outer boot with an integrated gaiter. We used a super insulating lightweight PE outsole to keep the weight down and the TPU midsole is excellent for crampon compatibility and stability on steep terrain. WEIGHT: 39.86 oz • 1130 g LAST: Olympus Mons CONSTRUCTION: Inner: Slip lasted Outer: Board Lasted OUTER BOOT: Cordura® upper lined with dual-density PE micro-cellular thermal insulating closed cell foam and thermo-reflective aluminium facing/ Insulated removable footbed/ Vibram® rubber rand See more here.

 






 

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