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  SummitClimb Pumori 2005: Dispatch Eight


This is the final 400 ft. steep section below the summit of Pumori.

Copyright©Ryan Waters

This is Philip Ling with the latest news from the Summitclimb Pumori Expedition 2005.

The expedition team is currently in Lobuche, situated at 4950m. Apart from a few minor colds and headaches, the team is doing well. The 5 Latvian members of the expedition have elected to spend a night at lower altitude in Dugla, 420 meters down the mountain from Lobuche, to aid their acclimatisation. We expect them to climb up to Lobuche tomorrow.

Tomorrow the rest of us head for Pumori Base Camp, situated at 5400m, and the day after some members who feel strong enough will start the climb of Pumori with a reconnaissance walk up the mountain to find a possible site for Advanced Base Camp, which will be situated at around 5800m.

Two days ago in Pangboche, we awoke as we do every morning to the cheery voice and face of Temba, one of our friendly Sherpa kitchen staff, bringing us what the Sherpas call 'Bed Tea'. Actually it should really be called 'Sleeping Bag Tea'. Basically it is hot tea served while we are still half asleep in our sleeping bags. It really is a great way to start the day!

After breakfast we went to the Pangboche Monastery to receive permission from the Gods to climb Pumori, and to receive blessings for a safe and successful expedition from Lama Geshe, one of the most senior and respected Lamas in Nepal. We were very honored to receive his blessings. After receiving permission from the Gods to climb Pumori we trekked to Pheriche, 4220m where we spent the night.

This morning we walked from Pheriche to Lobuche,4950m. It was a very pleasant walk with a single steep ascent of approximately 700 vertical metres. At the pass above Dugla we were reminded of the possible dangers of high altitude mountaineering, as we passed through many memorials dedicated to fallen climbers on Everest.

Philip Ling on behalf of Summitclimb.com

Today's trek from Pheriche took about 6 hours.  We are now at the final village, Lobuche, before we trek to basecamp.  The weather today wasn't the best for viewing the mountains, due to a great deal of low cloudiness.

However, I can still feel the massiveness of what is here, all around me. We have now reached an all-time new altitude record for me, 16000 feet or 4950 meters.  From here on, every day will be a new record for me!  The change in elevation is more noticeable here.  There are times when it feels like I am moving in slow motion.  It's interesting but completely safe.  I also wanted to make an editorial correction, my name is not James Duncan! It was a typo error.  I think someone was confusing me Capt. Kirk!

-Duncan

British Pumori dispatch

Greetings brothers and sisters This is a dispatch from the only Englishman on this expedition, Edwin Ludlow, John Fawcett claims to be an Englishman but he's from Yorkshire so that does not really count. We are approaching 5,000m we came from a place today I cannot remember the name of and we are camping at a place I cannot spell.  Being surrounded by colonials from America and Australia I am obviously the sole representative of the British Government and I am finding that they are not always giving me the respect that I consider an Englishman abroad is due. I am obviously in the leading group most days and most of the others are taking all sorts of tablets and concoctions in an attempt to keep up, but at the moment I am clean. Well all the best to all my followers out there and anyone else that is following these dispatches, I am sure that I will be a regular contributor in these dispatches, all the best Edwin Ludlow.

Chapel Hill Pumori dispatch

Day before base camp and the troops are ready to rumble.. The dreaded Lobuche has turned out to be a pleasant place, but then again we have not tried to sleep as of yet.. The trek from Pheriche gained us about 2200 feet, which translates to about 16,000 feet. The weather today was a bit cloudy and at times a bit snowy. Most people are strong, however a few have cold like problems and headaches. Roland Marx has been especially strong and has been my personal tent-mate for the ascent to base camp.. He does miss his family and for a guy over 50 has the heart of a lion.. He kinda looks like one too.. The Pumori show basically begins tomorrow so it is go time as of 6 AM. - Frazier

 

Dispatches

 

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A cold weather, high altitude double boot for extreme conditions The Olympus Mons is the perfect choice for 8000-meter peaks. This super lightweight double boot has a PE thermal insulating inner boot that is coupled with a thermo-reflective outer boot with an integrated gaiter. We used a super insulating lightweight PE outsole to keep the weight down and the TPU midsole is excellent for crampon compatibility and stability on steep terrain. WEIGHT: 39.86 oz • 1130 g LAST: Olympus Mons CONSTRUCTION: Inner: Slip lasted Outer: Board Lasted OUTER BOOT: Cordura® upper lined with dual-density PE micro-cellular thermal insulating closed cell foam and thermo-reflective aluminium facing/ Insulated removable footbed/ Vibram® rubber rand See more here.

 






 

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