Home
   Today's News
   8000 Meters Facts
  
Banners Ads
   Bookstore
   Classified Ads
   Climb for Peace
  
Contact

   Downloads
  
Educational
  
Expeditions
  
Facts
  
Games
  
Gear
  
History
  
Interviews

   Mailing List
   Media

   Medical
  
News (current)
   News Archives
   Sat Phones
   Search
   Seven Summits
   Snowboard
   Speakers
   Students
   Readers Guide
   Risks

   Trip Reports
   Visitor Agreement

   Volunteer/help

 

    
  

 

  




  Climbing the slopes of Mt. Everest is sometime as dangerous if not more dangerous than going for the summit: By George Dijmarescu


Self portrait, yeah was cold up there ©George Dijmarescu

Climbing the slopes of Mt. Everest is sometimes as dangerous if, not more dangerous than going for the summit. Last year while climbing towards the camp at 8300m or the last camp on the North side of Everest, I walked into a very unnerving situation. Only 30-45 minutes below this camp is a place as dangerous as climbing K2 and the danger is not from falling rocks or sharp ridges but from missiles of Oxygen bottles. While I was descending from the last camp after my first summit attempt with my wife Lakpa Sherpa and Slava Skripko (a Russian climber and friend) we sat down for a rest just minutes below when I was hit directly on my back by an empty Oxygen bottle, my luck was the large sleeping bag I was carrying inside my back pack, it took my breath away for a few seconds but other than a little pain I wasn't hurt at all. The moral shock was so great that I made the rest of the descent looking up in fear that another bottle might come down, constantly thinking if it would hit me just few centimeters higher would have hit me exactly behind my head with serious circumstances or death.

On my second attempt on May 30th, I was climbing in the same area, luckily with my eyes toward the last camp when a bottle came straight toward to my head, I only had time to move my head slightly to the right and it missed by few centimeters, the bottle picked up speed at every bounce and went down towards the two climbers just 100 meters bellow, I had time to yelled: "watche [watch out]" but the speed of the bottle was greater than the sound of my voice and went just less than a half meter on right hand side of an Irish climber, he had no chance to react since he was climbing with his eyes down on the ground, the bottle went strait down the North face and on the main Rongbuk Glacier.

I was angry at the Tibetan sherpa climbing above me, thinking he was responsible for sending the bottle down the mountain, I scream in anger but he couldn't hear me. Approaching the last camp I notice many empty bottles resting precariously only behind little pebbles of rocks, totally irresponsibly abandoned by climbers or sherpa. I realize this is a serious problem and a tragedy waiting to happen and I know will happen unless some awareness and education takes place.

After the summit I share my experience with two sherpa from Russell Brice's team, Phurba Tashi Sherpa and Chhiring Sherpa, both summited twice last year and are incredible strong and dedicated true guides, they informed me that one of the members from Russell team was also struck by an Oxygen bottle in the head and bled seriously. While Russell knows very well the terrain and place this ballet of flying bottles takes place, there is little one can do to prevent it.

A sign planted at the left turn below the snow slope (8150 m) can make climbers aware of danger, those who might not be able to read English or French or other international language might not benefit from the sign, therefore this can be mentioned at the regular meeting Russell and other commercial expedition hold and try to educate climbers of the ever waiting danger of carelessness. I truly believe this will save lives and prevent making Mt Everest an  dangerous place far from its summit.

Will see you on Everest, again. George Dijmarescu

To offer support or assistance for Gheorghe and Lakpa’s historic climb, please contact us at

 

Millet One Sport Everest Boot Expedition and mountaineering boot for high altitude and extremely cold conditions. The Everest has conquered all 14 mountains over 8,000m and also the Seven Summits- and has now had a makeover to ensure continued peak preformance. With a newer sung, Alpine Fit, and even lighter Expedition footwear for mountaineering in conditions of extreme cold.  NOTE US SIZES LISTED. See more here.

 







 

 

Altitude pre-
  
acclimatization

   Ascenders

   Atlas snowshoes

   Black Diamond

   Botas

   Brunton

   Carabiners

   CaVa Climbing Shoes
   Clearance

   Clif Bar

   Cloudveil

   CMI

   Crampons

   Edelweiss ropes
  
Eureka Tents

   Featured

   FoxRiver

   Garmin

   Granite Gear

   Harnesses
   Headlamps
   Helmets

   HighGear
   Ice Axes

   Kavu Eyewear

   Katadyn

   Kelty

   Kong

   Lekisport

   Lowepro

   Motorola

   Mountain Hardwear

   Mountainsmith

   MSR

   Nalgene

   New England Ropes

   Nikwax

   Omega

   Patagonia

   Pelican

   Petzl

   PowerBar

   Princeton Tec

   Prescription Glacier

   Glasses

   Primus

   Rope Bags

   Seattle Sports

   Serius
  
Sleeping Bags

   Stubai

   Suunto

   Tents

   Thermarest

   Trango

   Tool Logic

   Trekking Poles
   Yaktrax
  
and more here

 



  



Send email to     •   Copyright© 1998-2003 EverestNews.com
All rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
Disclaimer, Privacy Policy, Visitor Agreement, Legal Notes: Read it