Home
   Today's News
   8000 Meters Facts
  
Banners Ads
   Bookstore
   Classified Ads
   Climb for Peace
  
Contact

   Downloads
  
Educational
  
Expeditions
  
Facts
  
Games
  
Gear
  
History
  
Interviews

   Mailing List
   Media

   Medical
  
News (current)
   News Archives
   Sat Phones
   Search
   Seven Summits
   Snowboard
   Speakers
   Students
   Readers Guide
   Risks

   Trip Reports
   Visitor Agreement

   Volunteer/help

 

  




  Mt. Everest 2005: The Finns


©EverestNews.com

Update: The Finns are headed back to KTM... read their news below..

Update: This is the Finnish team's latest dispatch translated in its entirety:

"We've had discussions with other expedition leaders and according to those discussions the situation is this: On 14th of May three of the Norwegian team sherpas went to put the fixed ropes in place above 8300m. Because of the bad weather the attempt was unsuccessful and one sherpa got three frostbitten fingers. The sherpas returned to ABC (6400m). Meanwhile our expedition had already ascended to Camp 1 (7100m) for the summit attempt on the 15th. We didn't receive any information to Camp 1 or ABC that there were no fixed ropes so we were under the impression that all ropes are in place above 8300 meters and we don't need take ropes with us. On 20th of May during Tomi and Arri's summit attempt we discovered that there were no fixed lines. Why didn't anyone inform us about it? We have asked this from several expedition leaders and no-one seems to be responsible for it. After one sherpa of the Norwegian team was frostbitten other expedition leaders weren't too eager to send sherpas above 8300m for understandable reasons. The sherpas of Russel Brice and the Himalayan Experience concentrated on supplying their clients with oxygen and taking equipment to higher camps instead of doing the job they had agreed to do, which was to fix the ropes along the route.

 

On 18th of May the Norwegians and Indians were fed up with waiting for the ropes to be fixed and called for a meeting between expedition leaders. Well at least between the leaders of the nearby teams, because where our tents are located we were able to find by quickly asking around 5 teams (including us) who didn't know about this meeting or the fact that there were no fixed ropes yet above 8300 meters. In that meeting the leader of the Indian team asked who would like to do the job because it didn't seem to be getting ready with Russel in charge. Four people said yes: the Indian airforce team, the Norwegian team, the Russian team and the Indian army team. If this information had reached us on the 18th day, our summit team could have returned to Camp 1 or ABC to rest. But no-one pays any attention to small expeditions here, it's the money that does the talking...Originally we were going to fix the ropes on the difficult sections ourselves but based on the agreement we made with other teams in CBC (basecamp), we left all the ropes reserved for that purpose to CBC. We have 60 meters of rope in ABC, which would have been enough to tackle the most difficult sections, but we left that behind too because we were told on the 14th that it won't be needed since all the fixed ropes will be in place no later than on the 17th, which would have been ok for our summit attempt.

 

Tomi and Arri were the first ones to leave for the summit on 20th of May and so then there were no fixed lines above 8300 meters. They took some rope from the northeast ridge ja fixed a rope on the First step. Getting the rope took so much time that they had to turn back on the summit ridge at 12.30 and return to Camp 2. Today on Saturday 21st of May we found out that all the fixed ropes were put in place before noon. Today a couple of people also finally reached the summit from the north side of the mountain. It looks like that for many reasons, our summit attempt took place one day too early. So we didn't reach the summit. Anyway, until Friday the 20th we were the team who had reached the highest altitude and we did that without any sherpa assistance. We opened the trail. The team proud of its achievements."

 

According to another dispatch by the Finnish team, the highest altitude Tomi and Arri reached during their summit attempt was the Second step (8630m).

Previous Update

Update: "Unfortunately Tomi and Arri of the Finnish team had to turn back before the summit. The Finnish team were told by the Himalayan Experience that all fixed ropes are in place but in fact for some reason there were no fixed lines high up. The two are now back in camp 2 and will continue their way down to abc tomorrow."

Previous Update

Note: This is UNCONFIRMED, but from a reliable source: Again this is totally unconfirmed! (very hard to confirm news right now!!)

Update: Tomi and Arri are  on their way back down near camp 2 after their summit attempt, but there is no news yet if the attempt was successful.

Update May 20th, 2005: 6.30 p.m. (Nepalese time) Two members of the Finnish team (Tomi and Arri) are at camp 3 (8300m). Tonight they will pack their packs and leave for the summit attempt at midnight.

 

The team who tries to reach the summit of Everest:

Arri Leino         32y Espoo/Finland          

Veli-Pekka Mölsä   42y Espoo/Finland    

Teijo Lehtinen     44y Varese, Italy

Arto Suolanen      33y Anjalankoski/Finland   

Tomi Myllys        32y Vantaa/Finland         

Tero Järvinen      31y Tuusula/Finland        

Heikki Karinen     40y Tampere/Finland        

 

Finland Everest 2005

Members:

No

Full Name

Nationality

01

Mr. Veli Pekka (Molsa)

Finland

02

Mr. Tomi Pekka Myllys

Finland

03

Mr. Arri Jero Aleksi Leino

Finland

04

Mr. Arto Aatos Tapani S.

Finland

05

Mr. Heikki Mikael Karinen

Finland

06

Mr. Tero Juhani Jarvinen

Finland

07

Mr. Teijo Olavi Lehtinen

Finland

Nepali Staff

 

01

Mr. Chhauwa Sherpa

Cook

 

They are all very experienced climbers, their route is from Tibet side on the north side. A lot of research work around high altitude illness will be done.

 

More coming soon!

 

Millet One Sport Everest Boot  has made some minor changes by adding more Kevlar. USES Expeditions / High altitude / Mountaineering in extremely cold conditions / Isothermal to -75°F Gore-Tex® Top dry / Evazote Reinforcements with aramid threads. Avg. Weight: 5 lbs 13 oz Sizes: 5 - 14 DESCRIPTION Boot with semi-rigid shell and built-in Gore-Tex® gaiter reinforced by aramid threads, and removable inner slipper Automatic crampon attachment Non-compressive fastening Double zip, so easier to put on Microcellular midsole to increase insulation Removable inner slipper in aluminized alveolate Fiberglass and carbon footbed Cordura + Evazote upper Elasticated collar.

Expedition footwear for mountaineering in conditions of extreme cold.  NOTE US SIZES LISTED. See more here.

A cold weather, high altitude double boot for extreme conditions The Olympus Mons is the perfect choice for 8000-meter peaks. This super lightweight double boot has a PE thermal insulating inner boot that is coupled with a thermo-reflective outer boot with an integrated gaiter. We used a super insulating lightweight PE outsole to keep the weight down and the TPU midsole is excellent for crampon compatibility and stability on steep terrain. WEIGHT: 39.86 oz • 1130 g LAST: Olympus Mons CONSTRUCTION: Inner: Slip lasted Outer: Board Lasted OUTER BOOT: Cordura® upper lined with dual-density PE micro-cellular thermal insulating closed cell foam and thermo-reflective aluminium facing/ Insulated removable footbed/ Vibram® rubber rand See more here.

 






   Ascenders

   Atlas snowshoes

   Atomic

   Big Agnes

   Black Diamond

   Brunton

   Carabiners

   Chaco

   Cloudveil

   Columbia
  
CMI

   Crampons

   Edelweiss ropes
  
Eureka Tents

   Exofficio

   FiveTen

   Featured

   FoxRiver

   Gregory

   Granite Gear

   Harnesses
  
Headlamps

   Hestra
  
Helmets

   Helly Hansen

   HighGear

   HornyToad
  
Ice Axes

   Julbo

   Kavu Eyewear

   Katadyn

   Kelty

   Kong

   Lekisport

   Life is Good

   Lowa

   Lowe Alpine

   Lowepro

   Millet

   Motorola

   Mountain Hardwear

   Mountainsmith

   MSR

   Nalgene

   New England Ropes

   Nikwax

   Omega

   Osprey

   Outdoor Research
  
Patagonia

   Pelican

   Petzl

   Prana

   Princeton Tec

   Primus

   Rope Bags

   Royal Robbins

   Salomon

   Scarpa

   Scott

   Seattle Sports

   Serius
  
Sleeping Bags

   Sterling Rope

   Stubai

   Suunto

   Tents

   Teva

   Thermarest

   Trango

   Tool Logic

   Trekking Poles
  
Yaktrax
  
and more here

 



Send email to  • Copyright© 1998-2012  EverestNews.com
All rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
Disclaimer, Privacy Policy, Visitor Agreement, Legal Notes: Read it