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  Ascent to Mount Everest Without Oxygen and no Sherpa By Patricio Tisalema from Ecuador: I found three dead persons, It was very horrifying


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Ascent to Mount Everest Without Oxigen and no Sherpa By Patricio Tisalema from Ecuador

Well after the long staying while acclimating and doing the deposits, I was finally ready for the last attack.

I felt very well during the process and never had any high altitude problem, at the beginning I was a little bit afraid of climbing without Oxygen, specially because everybody said to me all time  that it is crazy. But step by step my confidence increased when I saw my development, I was always very fast even much faster than the Sherpas. I also went up to 8200m because I wanted to climb without Oxygen and it was very helpful to touch that altitude and descent to rest at Base Camp. 

I wanted to try a fast ascent in order to stay as less time as possible at the altitude, then  my idea was to use less camps. And I climbed in this way:

14th May Sunday

Early in the morning I left the ABC  in a straight ascent to C2 7500m. As I already had a deposit there, I made the Tent and slept till the next day.

15th May Monday

This day I did not want to leave too early, because I wanted to go straight up to the last Camp before the sunset and rest some hours before the Summit attempt, so, I left at midday  and got the 8100m at about 5pm, where I decided to make my tent because I thought it was going to be too late when I got the 8300m.

So after making the tent, I boiled water and prepared everything for the Ascent,  rested a little bit, woke up, prepared everything and left at midnight.

16th May Tuesday

I left the 8100m at midnight, that day climbed also some other climbers, I had the same pace as them up to 8550m at the ridge that I got at with the sunrise, here for first time in my life I felt the effects of altitude, threw up once and then kept the traverse here is where I found three dead persons, It was very horrifying, I calmed down and went ahead. I  realized the difference of climbing without Oxygen, because I could see how the others with Oxygen got in front and I slowed down. It was very hard to climb the first and second Step, specially the last one. After this I took the last snow ramp, and at its beginning I also found another deceased. Here I was very exhausted  and  for first time I used the fixed ropes, at that time I was alone on the mount because all summited members with Oxygen already intersected me on their way down. I was also very worried because of the descent, in my mind there was always the image of the 4 dead, It was a little bit late and I had to climb the last 150m that I think are the most difficult in the world. It was the most difficult part, my pace was very slow and I had to do the greatest effort I have ever done. Twice at 8750m and at 8800m I thought, I better do this point my Top and descent strong enough to my tent.

But at those moments, more than my physical force, worked the philosophy  that took me up there: my motivation,  the compromise I had with all people who where with me in Ecuador, all people who trust and support me, what I was going to contribute to my country, my dream of getting to the Top of the world, all these things took all my will – power to its limits! and I kept fighting till the end.

Finally, extremely exhausted and with the greatest sense of accomplishment at 1:00 pm I got the Top of the world! I was completely alone there, tears went out from my eyes, One thousand thoughts and memories came to my mind, my beginnings as mountaineer, when the thinking of Everest was a very remote Idea and those things. The most fascinating moment in my life. I was there!! conquered the Top of the world, there was nothing else above my feet on the earth. I said thanks to life, thanks Everest for letting me have the honor of being on its Top, I philosophized  and meditated for some minutes, took some pictures and videos, then started going down, I knew that it is the most difficult part and that a little error can finish in the death and there was four dead climbers that remembered me that the whole way down.

I never stopped, not even to drink water, I was very afraid of sitting down and lose the conscience and die up there, finally got the Camp 4 at 8300m where I decided to sleep in a friend's tent,. Some  Sherpas recommended me to use Oxygen to sleep, I knew I was finished physically, but I felt that my breathing system was working very well. Besides I was decided not to use Oxygen at all, so I slept without oxygen and had no problem at all.

17th May Wednesday

On the next day, when I opened my eyes, it was hard to start again but after some efforts I woke up, wore my stuff, took my things and started descending, I took all my deposits from all the camps and at night very tired I got the ABC.

Once there I realized that I was the first climber without Oxygen this year and felt very happy of descending without any frostbitten member and completely healthy.

After a short resting I descend to base camp, then back to Kathmandu and finally back to Quito where I had a big reception and could finally rest.

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