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   Expedition Dhaulagiri Lina Quesada: Bad weather


Earlier: Lina Quesada, Dhaulagiri Expedition, bad weather keeps the team from making progress

Constant snowfalls and very strong wind in the high altitude camps

April 24, 2007 

Climber Lina Quesada, from Sevilla, and her Italian teammates have not made any progress on the mountain for a couple of days now, because of bad weather.  The weather is really bad since some days ago in Dhaulagiri .  It doesn’t stop snowing on base camp and a very strong wind blows on the mountain, so much that none of the expeditions are using the high altitude camps.  The spitir of the group is good and they kill time playing cards, eating and resting as much as possible while waiting for the weather to improve.  In the next few days they expect a window of good weather and the group would use it the best way possible. 

The 2 last nights have been hellish.  The wind blows all the time very strong and the cold temperatures make it hard to rest.  There is frost or ice inside the tents.  It is impossible even to melt snow to make water.  Ten well acclimatized climbers wanted to ascend, but the last attempt to climb and to carry materials to camp 3 was impossible.  The latest news is that all the expeditions are at base camp waiting for the weather to improve. 

Translated from Spanish by Jorge Rivera

Dhaulagiri Expedition: The team rests at base camp after spending the night in camp 2 

With a good acclimatization, they will start to climb if the wind lets them

April 19, 2007:

The Dhaulagiri Expeidition, which has climber Lina Quesada, from Sevilla, as a member, has spent an easy night in the tents of camp 2, at 6,600m of altitude in the North-Northeast face of Dhaulagiri and from where a magnificent view of the emblematic Annapurna can be seen.  The wind has not stopped blowing violently, it looked like it could blow away the tents from their stakes.  They returned to base camp again for a well deserved rest.  The acclimatization has been practically completed and they will soon be in conditions to start the plans to climb this eight-thousand of the Himalayas whose summit has never been stepped upon by a woman.  

Lina Quesada and another Italian climber –Rosa Morotti- could be the first women in the world to reach the summit of Dhaulagiri at 8,167 meters.  The rest of the climbers are Mario Merelli, Mario Panzeri, Sergio Dalla Longa, Domenico Bellinghieri and Stefano Magri.  All of them are waiting for the weather to improve in order to make the definitive attempt.  

Translated from Spanish by Jorge Rivera

Dhaulagiri Expedition: Camp 2 has been installed at 6,600 meters

The wind is the main obstacle for Lina Quesada and her teammates

Climber Lina Quesada, from Sevilla, and her Italian teammates have installed camp 2 at 6,600 m. of altitude on the North-Northeast Face of Dhaulagiri (8,167m).  New groups have arrived to Dhaula’s base camp and now there are three expeditions on the mountain with 22 climbers.  They are also expecting two other groups soon.  The weather is always cloudy with light snowfalls and sudden temperature falls.  The strong wind is constant and in high altitudes it can be violent and can be noticed on the crest of the mountain.

On the first attempt from camp 1 to camp 2 the bad weather and the wind made them look for shelter immediately.  Inside the tent, with these conditions there can be -10º C during the night.  The wind only recedes a little when the sun comes up.

Camp 2 has been finally mounted with a couple of tents at 6,600 meters, although it is in an position that is exposed to avalanches so the group will only use it when they attempt to go further up and they have left little material in it.  On the next day they will go to camp 2 again to find, if possible, a safer location.

In some points of the trail the slope makes them pay a lot of attention to their steps and they will fix lines to move more cautiously, especially during the ascents.  All the members of the expedition are fine and with a high morale and waiting for the temperature to rise a little to move easier in the high altitudes.

Javier Blázquez

Translated form Spanish by Jorge Rivera

 

 
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