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  Cho Oyo Team Preps in Tingri

6 September 2013

Today we are in Tingri at 4300 metres / 14,100 feet. Our climbing team of 7 foreign members from 5 countries together with 3 Sherpas are resting here for 2 days, getting used to the high altitude. Under blue skies we roam the streets and walk surrounding hills. Now we are officially on the Tibetan Plateau. The weather is sunny, windy and the temps warmed up for a few hours in the middle of the day. We can see Mount Everest and Mount Cho Oyu (our destination) from here. The surrounding plateau at the base of the big mountains is very green, with abundant water flowing. We saw quite few ducks wading in ponds during our walk around dusty Tingri yesterday. This town is a trading center for the Everest region. Groups of nomads wander the streets trying to sell fat sheep. Kids skip along the road to and from school.

Shopkeepers load and unload piles of boxes, tools, ropes, food. The chugging sound of one cylinder diesel tractors echoes up and down the street as horse carts trot by.

While having breakfast of pancakes and eggs the team discussed the destination of today's acclimatisation hike. We decided to walk up a brown hill outside Tingri. Dogs from the villages often follow walkers high up to the hills, but unfortunately we were left without their company this time.

Walking up some 400 metres on gentle scree slopes brought us to the top decorated with prayer flags. Under a clear blue sky we had excellent views over Everest, Cho Oyu and the Tibetan plateau with its fields in countless shades of green.

Tomorrow morning we are excited to drive up to Cho Oyu basecamp at circa 5000 metres / 16,500 feet, so we can begin our attempt to climb the 6th highest mountain in the world.

 

5 September - 

We visited the Milarepa cave on our journey towards Tingri. Milarepa was a Buddhist Saint instrumental in bringing Budhhism to Tibet. As he arrived to the country he settled in a cave (we had the honour to visit the tiny cave) that later became a monastry. Much to our delight, a young monk showed us around the entire monastery.

Today the weather was on our side. The skies were crystal clear with a little bit of cloud cover far on the horizon.  After about a half hour's drive from Milarepa's monastry and cave Shisha Pangma appeared in all its magnificent beauty. We had ample opportunity to admire the mountain from Yakri Shong La at 5050 metres. Not long after this spectacle, Cho Oyu, and the smaller mountains in the range imposed on us with no cloud cover and not a bit of wind on the respective summits. The mountains stayed with us as we made our way to Tingri, where we checked in at the Ha Hoo hotel.

We enjoyed a great lunch and went for a short walk to Qomolangma viewpoint, build on the remains of an ancient fort on top of the old Tingri town. Dan guided us through this typical Tibetan town with all its narrow and little streets.

The food we have enjoyed during our journey has been delicious and very appetising, we have consumed very healthy vegetables, meats, rice, etc. Of course during all of our dining experience we have use the traditional chop stick, very easy for some to use and very funny to be seen used by others as well, even Matti has managed to become a graded apprentice in the use of chop stick.

The whole experience of the team sitting together as one around a large table, with the central spinning consoul for the food to be shared more easily, has been a great boost to our team building experience, with the sharing of stories and working out our next days programme as well. If anything the amount of food that we were given has far surpassed my expectations and I for one would recommend our hotels in Tingri and Nylam to anyone.

Cho Oyu seen from the Qomolangma viewpoint in Tingri. James Grieve Photo

Cho Oyu seen from the Qomolangma viewpoint in Tingri. James Grieve Photo.

 

 

Millet One Sport Everest Boot  has made some minor changes by adding more Kevlar. USES Expeditions / High altitude / Mountaineering in extremely cold conditions / Isothermal to -75°F Gore-Tex® Top dry / Evazote Reinforcements with aramid threads. Avg. Weight: 5 lbs 13 oz Sizes: 5 - 14 DESCRIPTION Boot with semi-rigid shell and built-in Gore-Tex® gaiter reinforced by aramid threads, and removable inner slipper Automatic crampon attachment Non-compressive fastening Double zip, so easier to put on Microcellular midsole to increase insulation Removable inner slipper in aluminized alveolate Fiberglass and carbon footbed Cordura + Evazote upper Elasticated collar.

Expedition footwear for mountaineering in conditions of extreme cold.  NOTE US SIZES LISTED. See more here.







 

 

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