Home
   Today's News
   8000 Meters Facts
  
Banners Ads
   Bookstore
   Classified Ads
   Climb for Peace
  
Contact

   Downloads
  
Educational
  
Expeditions
  
Facts
  
Games
  
Gear
  
History
  
Interviews

   Mailing List
   Media

   Medical
  
News (current)
   News Archives
   Sat Phones
   Search
   Seven Summits
   Snowboard
   Speakers
   Students
   Readers Guide
   Risks

   Trip Reports
   Visitor Agreement

   Volunteer/help

 

    
  

 

  




  Mt. Everest 2005: American Expedition 2005 Update One


©EverestNews.com

Update Subject: Author: Mike O'Brien
Place: Namche Bazaar 11,500ft

Hi! I’m in a cybernet cafe in Namche Bazaar at about 11500ft. Trekked in here yesterday, tough trek for many, took about 6 hours. We took our time, had a nice lunch along the way. Tip puked his guts out a couple of times, some kind of stomach bug he’s fighting. Jenni was good, but a little slow (as was Tip, due to illness). I felt great and made good progress.  Beautiful hike, but got steep and had switchbacks for the last 2 1\2 hours as we gained 800 meters. Flew into Lukla (2860m/9383ft.) the previous day, then hiked for two hours, mostly downhill, to Phatdink (2652m./8700ft,) where we camped for the night.

Tip and Jenni met me at Delhi airport (another long sleepless layover), where they got in early due to being placed on a different flight. Apparently the Indians were going to send them back to Zurich because they didn’t have visas, for India. Their Bombay to Delhi flight was considered domestic, thus they were going to have to use a domestic terminal, which they couldn’t get to without going thru customs and immigration. Only Jenni’s tears prevented that disaster, as they gave in and put them on an international flight that was stopping in Delhi.

Got to Katmandu (1300m/4265ft) and met our friend Phil Crampton [Phil was a leader on the 2000 Cho Oyu climbing team with Mike & Chris,] who took us shopping and did all the haggling for us [always important to have a friend who speaks Mandarin when it comes time to haggle.] He was in town for a month buying gear to bring back to Tibet, where he and his wife are working for The Tibetan International Mountain Guide School. Had a good time hanging with him, but we were very rushed. Took off the next morning at 4am. Cluster@%*& at the airport. Bags and people everywhere. Twenty of the team’s bags are still down there, hopefully they will arrive today by yak. I have both of mine. Tip and Jenni are missing one of theirs.

Anyway, so far so good. No problems yet. Lots of sun today and yesterday, high wind though for a while yesterday on the hike up. Great scenery, 5-6 rickety bridges over the Dudh Kosi River (great film footage!) Today is a rest day, tomorrow we go up to another town Pangboche (3757m/12,326ft.)  Should be at Base Camp by Wednesday [April 13.] We have a huge group - about 11 trekkers [to Base Camp,] 18 going to Lhotse (including 6 "leaders in training) and 7 of us (including Dan) on the Everest permit. Arnold Koster is leading, he’s a Dutch guy who summitted last year from Tibet. Met our Sherpa, nice guy named Pasang Nutbu. Everest summitter, about 41, not great English, but a great smile and eager to help (we told him he can screw off, basically, till we get to Base Camp, and even then I think we will only need him for Camp 1 and above to help with gear, etc.) Dan [Mazur the expedition organizer and owner of SummitClimb] is his usual jovial self, nice to see, after the hard and tragic Pumori climb, which you found out was marked by the death of my friend Alex, and a Sherpa who was Dan’s friend and longtime worker.

I am in good spirits, healthy, and getting confident about this, though I know it will be difficult and much pain will have to be endured. I will try to write next week from Base Camp and also try to call sometime. Gotta go get some breakfast and work on getting my boots to fit my crampons. Talk to you soon, Mike

Background

Two brothers, Mike and Chris O’Brien are hoping to become the first American brothers to reach the summit of Mount Everest together in spring of 2005. Their goal is to raise funds for the Hereditary Disease Foundation. The HDF provides money for scientific research seeking cures for hereditary diseases such as Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. The Hereditary Disease Foundation is significant to Mike and Chris because they have lost several family members to Huntington’s disease.

A close friend of the brothers, Daniel Mazur will be the expedition organizer and leader. Dan has climbed many of the world’s highest peaks including Everest and K2. Although Dan has successfully and safely helped many people to high summits throughout the world, he does not consider himself to be a “guiding service”. This means Chris and Mike will be responsible for themselves; they will set up camps, carry loads and help to fix lines. They are planning a low cost, self supporting expedition. This is the way they believe climbing was meant to be.

Mike and Dan have been training in Washington on the slopes of Mt. Rainer, as well as testing their gear and practicing their climbing technique. Meanwhile, Chris is back in Philadelphia working towards his MD/PhD. If all goes well on Everest, Chris will be running down the mountain to Katmandu, in order to catch a flight to his graduation.

Dispatches

Millet One Sport Everest Boot  has made some minor changes by adding more Kevlar. USES Expeditions / High altitude / Mountaineering in extremely cold conditions / Isothermal to -75°F Gore-Tex® Top dry / Evazote Reinforcements with aramid threads. Avg. Weight: 5 lbs 13 oz Sizes: 5 - 14 DESCRIPTION Boot with semi-rigid shell and built-in Gore-Tex® gaiter reinforced by aramid threads, and removable inner slipper Automatic crampon attachment Non-compressive fastening Double zip, so easier to put on Microcellular midsole to increase insulation Removable inner slipper in aluminized alveolate Fiberglass and carbon footbed Cordura + Evazote upper Elasticated collar.

Expedition footwear for mountaineering in conditions of extreme cold.  NOTE US SIZES LISTED. See more here.

A cold weather, high altitude double boot for extreme conditions The Olympus Mons is the perfect choice for 8000-meter peaks. This super lightweight double boot has a PE thermal insulating inner boot that is coupled with a thermo-reflective outer boot with an integrated gaiter. We used a super insulating lightweight PE outsole to keep the weight down and the TPU midsole is excellent for crampon compatibility and stability on steep terrain. WEIGHT: 39.86 oz • 1130 g LAST: Olympus Mons CONSTRUCTION: Inner: Slip lasted Outer: Board Lasted OUTER BOOT: Cordura® upper lined with dual-density PE micro-cellular thermal insulating closed cell foam and thermo-reflective aluminium facing/ Insulated removable footbed/ Vibram® rubber rand See more here.

 






 

   Ascenders

   Atlas snowshoes

   Atomic

   Big Agnes

   Black Diamond

   Brunton

   Carabiners

   Chaco

   Cloudveil

   Columbia
  
CMI

   Crampons

   Edelweiss ropes
  
Eureka Tents

   Exofficio

   FiveTen

   Featured

   FoxRiver

   Gregory

   Granite Gear

   Harnesses
  
Headlamps

   Hestra
  
Helmets

   Helly Hansen

   HighGear

   HornyToad
  
Ice Axes

   Julbo

   Kavu Eyewear

   Katadyn

   Kelty

   Kong

   Lekisport

   Life is Good

   Lowa

   Lowe Alpine

   Lowepro

   Millet

   Motorola

   Mountain Hardwear

   Mountainsmith

   MSR

   Nalgene

   New England Ropes

   Nikwax

   Omega

   Osprey

   Outdoor Research
  
Patagonia

   Pelican

   Petzl

   Prana

   Princeton Tec

   Primus

   Rope Bags

   Royal Robbins

   Salomon

   Scarpa

   Scott

   Seattle Sports

   Serius
  
Sleeping Bags

   Sterling Rope

   Stubai

   Suunto

   Tents

   Teva

   Thermarest

   Trango

   Tool Logic

   Trekking Poles
  
Yaktrax
  
and more here

 



Send email to     •   Copyright© 1998-2005 EverestNews.com
All rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
Disclaimer, Privacy Policy, Visitor Agreement, Legal Notes: Read it