Home
   Today's News
   8000 Meters Facts
  
Banners Ads
   Bookstore
   Classified Ads
   Climb for Peace
  
Contact

   Downloads
  
Educational
  
Expeditions
  
Facts
  
Games
  
Gear
  
History
  
Interviews

   Mailing List
   Media

   Medical
  
News (current)
   News Archives
   Sat Phones
   Search
   Seven Summits
   Snowboard
   Speakers
   Students
   Readers Guide
   Risks

   Trip Reports
   Visitor Agreement

   Volunteer/help

 

    
  

 

  




  Mt. Everest 2005: Waldemar Niclevicz: The wind is still the obstacle


Photo © Waldemar Niclevicz

05/11/2005

51st day of the 10 Years of Brazil on Everest Expedition

Base Camp (5,400 m)

Dear Friends!

Unhappily we are still in base camp, because the weather forecasts still advice not to climb.

The wind, above 100 Km/h, continues blowing hard in higher altitudes.  Today, those Sherpas that tried to go to camp 3 and 4, came back after the daybreak to camp 2, where they didn't have much choice but to rest.  Tomorrow the wind should begin to diminish in intensity and the hope of the Sherpas, an all of us, is that the can finally get to the South Col, the location of Camp 4, practically at 8 thousand meters of altitude.

Yesterday I had a big meeting here in base camp, among the chiefs of the commercial expeditions (the bigger ones, with greater number of members and Sherpas, and the best organized). The main topic was how and when the route from the South Col (camp 4) to the summit will be equipped, using oxygen bottles and fixing ropes on the hardest part of the climb. A hard work, that leaves the trail open for the clients of the commercial expeditions. Of course, the climbers of the non commercial expeditions, like in our case, get benefits from this work. 

Well, our hope is to make a summit attack on the next few days, my dream was to get to the summit of Everest on May 14, exactly like it was 10 years ago, independently from the fact that there were fixed lines on the South Col route or not.  But unhappily the forecast is that right on the 14th there will be some storm or blizzard on Everest.  The situation should get worst around the 17th, and we still don't know what could happen with the weather later.

This instability in the weather is a danger for us climbers and also for Sherpas.  The wind is terrible, it makes the thermal sensation be lower and makes the risk of frostbite greater.  The snow can also betray, besides making progress more difficult, it also raises the risk of avalanches.

The sad example is what happened yesterday with Pema, the high altitude carrier of our Spanish friends from Valencia that are also part of our expedition.  The long exposition to the wind, on the way to camp 4, made two of his fingers to suffer serious frostbite.  The extreme situation forced this trip to the South Col to be interrupted, and the equipment the Sherpas were carrying, were left at 7,500m, deposited close to the so called Yellow Band.

We stayed late at night waiting for Pema here at base camp, but he didn't show until this morning, around 09h00.  We took him immediately to the medical post in base camp.  Dr. An who saw me weeks ago and recommended antibiotics to treat my throat, took care of the Sherpa of the Spanish. 

Pema continued then to the hospital (which is one day from base by foot) of HRAN in Periche to be treated, following recommendations from Dr. An, and also knowing that he could not work again as a high altitude porter on Everest for the rest of the season (coming back to Everest soon was his intention, he was not aware of the gravity of his frostbite!!!).  Pema is just 20 years old, he is married with a son three months old, and was the first time he was working as a high altitude porter on Everest.

Look at the picture of Pema being attended by Dr. An Janssen here in base camp.  Below, the sad situation of his frozen fingers.

Until tomorrow!

A big hug,

Waldemar Niclevicz

Translated from Portuguese by Jorge Rivera

Dispatches

 

Millet One Sport Everest Boot  has made some minor changes by adding more Kevlar. USES Expeditions / High altitude / Mountaineering in extremely cold conditions / Isothermal to -75°F Gore-Tex® Top dry / Evazote Reinforcements with aramid threads. Avg. Weight: 5 lbs 13 oz Sizes: 5 - 14 DESCRIPTION Boot with semi-rigid shell and built-in Gore-Tex® gaiter reinforced by aramid threads, and removable inner slipper Automatic crampon attachment Non-compressive fastening Double zip, so easier to put on Microcellular midsole to increase insulation Removable inner slipper in aluminized alveolate Fiberglass and carbon footbed Cordura + Evazote upper Elasticated collar.

Expedition footwear for mountaineering in conditions of extreme cold.  NOTE US SIZES LISTED. See more here.




 

 

Altitude pre-
  
acclimatization

   Ascenders

   Atlas snowshoes

   Black Diamond

   Botas

   Brunton

   Carabiners

   CaVa Climbing Shoes
   Clearance

   Clif Bar

   Cloudveil

   CMI

   Crampons

   Edelweiss ropes
  
Eureka Tents

   Featured

   FoxRiver

   Garmin

   Granite Gear

   Harnesses
   Headlamps
   Helmets

   HighGear
   Ice Axes

   Kavu Eyewear

   Katadyn

   Kelty

   Kong

   Lekisport

   Lowepro

   Motorola

   Mountain Hardwear

   Mountainsmith

   MSR

   Nalgene

   New England Ropes

   Nikwax

   Omega

   Patagonia

   Pelican

   Petzl

   PowerBar

   Princeton Tec

   Prescription Glacier

   Glasses

   Primus

   Rope Bags

   Seattle Sports

   Serius
  
Sleeping Bags

   Stubai

   Suunto

   Tents

   Thermarest

   Trango

   Tool Logic

   Trekking Poles
   Yaktrax
  
and more here

 



  



Send email to  • Copyright© 1998-2012  EverestNews.com
All rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
Disclaimer, Privacy Policy, Visitor Agreement, Legal Notes: Read it