Home
   Today's News
   8000 Meters Facts
  
Banners Ads
   Bookstore
   Classified Ads
   Climb for Peace
  
Contact

   Downloads
  
Educational
  
Expeditions
  
Facts
  
Games
  
Gear
  
History
  
Interviews

   Mailing List
   Media

   Medical
  
News (current)
   News Archives
   Sat Phones
   Search
   Seven Summits
   Snowboard
   Speakers
   Students
   Readers Guide
   Risks

   Trip Reports
   Visitor Agreement

   Volunteer/help

 

    
  

 

  




  Mt. Everest 2006: FANTASY INTO REALITY


Bottom of Fantasy Ridge: it starts with a steep technical climb and then with an awkward almost horizontal pitch before some elevation is gain. 

Fantasy Ridge is the last major unclimbed ridge of Mt. Everest.  Although there have been more than two thousand summits of Everest, no summit was ever achieved by way of Fantasy Ridge.  Furthermore, less than a handful of expeditions have succeeded on the Kangshung side of the mountain.

The ridge presents a formidable challenge: first, because of the lack of any precise information regarding its geography; second, lack of evaluation of the make up of rock and snow; and third, the unknown
but ever-present danger of avalanche.  The ridge is also exposed to the full strength of morning sun which normally amplifies the danger of falling rock and melting ice which produces avalanches.

Fantasy Ridge was named by George Leigh Mallory.  It is thought that the name refers to the impossible difficulty of the terrain and the belief that a successful traverse exists only in “fantasy.”  Also referred to as East Ridge due to its position in relation to Mt. Everest, the name Fantasy Ridge stuck. The ridge presents an awkward, long, almost horizontal pitch with cornice ridges often on both sides.  Attacking the ridge will require a new, radical approach, including the possibility of climbing early mornings and at night when the sun is less of a factor.  The ascent is a combination of alpine and expedition style.  The latter style will be employed as insurance against the need for evacuation, either for injury or because further progress is impossible.

Previous attempts by classical approach from Kharta had the problem of the two week trek to base camp during which time expeditions faced delay and exhaustion. 

Our approach has never been considered.

Second half of Fantasy Ridge: Crevasses were observed at this altitude but an alpine style will be almost certain the choice of ascent.

Acknowledging the reality of an almost impossible rescue evacuation in case of serious injury, ropes will be necessary to leave behind an exit strategy. Upon reaching the bottom of the ridge, a decision will be made based on the ground snow and ice conditions. An early start of the expedition gives a better chance of avoiding avalanches and falling rock by climbing in colder temperatures.  On the other hand, the colder temperatures are more likely to produce frostbite and prolonged exposure.  Conditions will be carefully weighed before we choose the lesser evil.  From this point on there will be little permanent fixed rope. Traveling light and fast will be the goal.

As formidable as it may seem, the East Ridge ends on the Northeast Ridge at 7800 meters, more than 1000 meters below the summit of Mt Everest.  From there the notorious Pinnacles will have to be overcome.  This presents a classic, highly technical high altitude mountaineering climb.  At that time the mountain conditions, the time left in the expedition and our over all physical and mental condition will determine how we will proceed for the summit.

Coming in Spring 2006: The Everest Fantasy Ridge: Become a sponsor Today! See here for more.

A cold weather, high altitude double boot for extreme conditions The Olympus Mons is the perfect choice for 8000-meter peaks. This super lightweight double boot has a PE thermal insulating inner boot that is coupled with a thermo-reflective outer boot with an integrated gaiter. We used a super insulating lightweight PE outsole to keep the weight down and the TPU midsole is excellent for crampon compatibility and stability on steep terrain. WEIGHT: 39.86 oz • 1130 g LAST: Olympus Mons CONSTRUCTION: Inner: Slip lasted Outer: Board Lasted OUTER BOOT: Cordura® upper lined with dual-density PE micro-cellular thermal insulating closed cell foam and thermo-reflective aluminium facing/ Insulated removable footbed/ Vibram® rubber rand See more here.

 

Millet One Sport Everest Boot  has made some minor changes by adding more Kevlar. USES Expeditions / High altitude / Mountaineering in extremely cold conditions / Isothermal to -75°F Gore-Tex® Top dry / Evazote Reinforcements with aramid threads. Avg. Weight: 5 lbs 13 oz Sizes: 5 - 14 DESCRIPTION Boot with semi-rigid shell and built-in Gore-Tex® gaiter reinforced by aramid threads, and removable inner slipper Automatic crampon attachment Non-compressive fastening Double zip, so easier to put on Microcellular midsole to increase insulation Removable inner slipper in aluminized alveolate Fiberglass and carbon footbed Cordura + Evazote upper Elasticated collar.

Expedition footwear for mountaineering in conditions of extreme cold.  NOTE US SIZES LISTED. See more here.




 

 

Altitude pre-
  
acclimatization

   Ascenders

   Atlas snowshoes

   Black Diamond

   Botas

   Brunton

   Carabiners

   CaVa Climbing Shoes
   Clearance

   Clif Bar

   Cloudveil

   CMI

   Crampons

   Edelweiss ropes
  
Eureka Tents

   Featured

   FoxRiver

   Garmin

   Granite Gear

   Harnesses
   Headlamps
   Helmets

   HighGear
   Ice Axes

   Kavu Eyewear

   Katadyn

   Kelty

   Kong

   Lekisport

   Lowepro

   Motorola

   Mountain Hardwear

   Mountainsmith

   MSR

   Nalgene

   New England Ropes

   Nikwax

   Omega

   Patagonia

   Pelican

   Petzl

   PowerBar

   Princeton Tec

   Prescription Glacier

   Glasses

   Primus

   Rope Bags

   Seattle Sports

   Serius
  
Sleeping Bags

   Stubai

   Suunto

   Tents

   Thermarest

   Trango

   Tool Logic

   Trekking Poles
   Yaktrax
  
and more here

 



  



Send email to  • Copyright© 1998-2012  EverestNews.com
All rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
Disclaimer, Privacy Policy, Visitor Agreement, Legal Notes: Read it