Home
   Today's News
   8000 Meters Facts
  
Banners Ads
   Bookstore
   Classified Ads
   Climb for Peace
  
Contact

   Downloads
  
Educational
  
Expeditions
  
Facts
  
Games
  
Gear
  
History
  
Interviews

   Mailing List
   Media

   Medical
  
News (current)
   News Archives
   Sat Phones
   Search
   Seven Summits
   Snowboard
   Speakers
   Students
   Readers Guide
   Risks

   Trip Reports
   Visitor Agreement

   Volunteer/help

 

    
  

 

  




  The Bering Strait Odyssey expedition evacuated


Dixie Dansercoer and Troy Henkels have been evacuated by a rescue helicopter

Brussels Base camp, 7 April 2005 – We have just received word from The Bering Strait Odyssey communications headquarters in Alaska that the expedition has been evacuated due to extremely bad weather conditions. The south-easterly drift that drove the men away from their route had picked up enormous speed and it became impossible to pursue the expedition. Dixie Dansercoer and Troy Henkels have been picked up by a rescue helicopter on April 6, around noon Alaskan time, past midnight Belgian time.

The worst conditions

After one week on the ice, the explorers were making steady progress even if they were slowed down by both the continuing southerly drift and the difficulty of navigating through a maze of bad convoluted ice and small open leads.

On April 5, Troy & Dixie were substantially south of King Island, drifting more and more away from their planned NW heading towards Siberia. The farther south they drifted, the worse the ice conditions became. The drift reached about 2km/hour.  

After a long night, Dixie and Troy had to face the fact that an evacuation would be much better in a controlled spot (still not too far from Nome) than a rescue helicopter in a remote area of the Bering Sea and in stormy conditions. 

Weather predictions had warned that Wednesday’s weather would take a turn for the worse, with high winds and precipitations, meaning that Dixie and Troy would need to be on solid ice and hunkered down to be able to withstand such a storm. Their present location was not solid enough. There was no guarantee that they could make it north-west to better ice in time for a storm with winds of up to 80km/hr. 

“It would have been too easy to continue, allow ourselves to physically weaken, place ourselves in a risky environment for the search and rescue team to reach us.  We made the responsible decision, considering everyone involved, to opt for an evacuation instead of a rescue” says Dansercoer. 

Adventure is much more than competition

Although Dixie Dansercoer and Troy Henkels’ goal of a double-back crossing of the Bering Strait has not been realised, several things must be noted.

This feat has never before been tried. The first successful single crossing on foot was only accomplished as recently as 1998 – after four failed attempts – and from Siberia to Alaska (where a southerly drift turns out to be more positive). Since then, seven more attempts have been made, all unsuccessful.  

Dixie and Troy have faced extraordinarily difficult conditions, among them extreme cold, the hazards of travelling across unstable ice flows, and unpredictable weather.  

Before the expedition, Dixie Dansercoer explained his philosophy, “Preparation needs to be optimal. Whatever gets me closer to success, I do.” At the same time he acknowledged the inherent difficulties of the polar environment, humbly saying, “Nature decides.”   

For Dixie, every expedition is a success in terms of experience. The unique knowledge gained – both practical and personal – cannot be acquired in any other way. This lesson is only one out of many that the expedition has provided.

Troy Henkels adds “We both lived a privilege that very few people on this planet have witnessed. And even though we were fully prepared, we won’t ever have the power to influence the weather conditions. ” 

A feeling of pride, no matter what the outcome

“As sponsors of The Bering Strait Odyssey, we at Deloitte, DHL and Job@ feel very honoured to participate in Dixie’s adventure” says Delphine de la Kethulle, spokesperson for the expedition in Belgium. “We thank Dixie, Troy and their supporting team for their heroic efforts. And for all the inspiration The Bering Strait Odyssey has given to all of us. Clearly, the spirit of the expedition and the style in which it is executed enhanced again the motto we all share: “passion to perform” - no matter what the outcome.” 

After some really necessary sleep, Dixie and Troy will begin their communications, collect equipment, and gather their bearings.

As the storm in Alaska begins to rage, they know that the timing was indeed just right.

Millet One Sport Everest Boot has made some minor changes by adding more Kevlar. USES Expeditions / High altitude / Mountaineering in extremely cold conditions / Isothermal to -75°F Gore-Tex® Top dry / Evazote Reinforcements with aramid threads. Avg. Weight: 5 lbs 13 oz Sizes: 5 - 14 DESCRIPTION Boot with semi-rigid shell and built-in Gore-Tex® gaiter reinforced by aramid threads, and removable inner slipper Automatic crampon attachment Non-compressive fastening Double zip, so easier to put on Microcellular midsole to increase insulation Removable inner slipper in aluminized alveolate Fiberglass and carbon footbed Cordura + Evazote upper Elasticated collar.

Expedition footwear for mountaineering in conditions of extreme cold.  NOTE US SIZES LISTED. See more here.

A cold weather, high altitude double boot for extreme conditions The Olympus Mons is the perfect choice for 8000-meter peaks. This super lightweight double boot has a PE thermal insulating inner boot that is coupled with a thermo-reflective outer boot with an integrated gaiter. We used a super insulating lightweight PE outsole to keep the weight down and the TPU midsole is excellent for crampon compatibility and stability on steep terrain. WEIGHT: 39.86 oz • 1130 g LAST: Olympus Mons CONSTRUCTION: Inner: Slip lasted Outer: Board Lasted OUTER BOOT: Cordura® upper lined with dual-density PE micro-cellular thermal insulating closed cell foam and thermo-reflective aluminium facing/ Insulated removable footbed/ Vibram® rubber rand See more here.

 






 

   Ascenders

   Atlas snowshoes

   Atomic

   Big Agnes

   Black Diamond

   Brunton

   Carabiners

   Chaco

   Cloudveil

   Columbia
  
CMI

   Crampons

   Edelweiss ropes
  
Eureka Tents

   Exofficio

   FiveTen

   Featured

   FoxRiver

   Gregory

   Granite Gear

   Harnesses
  
Headlamps

   Hestra
  
Helmets

   Helly Hansen

   HighGear

   HornyToad
  
Ice Axes

   Julbo

   Kavu Eyewear

   Katadyn

   Kelty

   Kong

   Lekisport

   Life is Good

   Lowa

   Lowe Alpine

   Lowepro

   Millet

   Motorola

   Mountain Hardwear

   Mountainsmith

   MSR

   Nalgene

   New England Ropes

   Nikwax

   Omega

   Osprey

   Outdoor Research
  
Patagonia

   Pelican

   Petzl

   Prana

   Princeton Tec

   Primus

   Rope Bags

   Royal Robbins

   Salomon

   Scarpa

   Scott

   Seattle Sports

   Serius
  
Sleeping Bags

   Sterling Rope

   Stubai

   Suunto

   Tents

   Teva

   Thermarest

   Trango

   Tool Logic

   Trekking Poles
  
Yaktrax
  
and more here

 



Send email to     •   Copyright© 1998-2005 EverestNews.com
All rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
Disclaimer, Privacy Policy, Visitor Agreement, Legal Notes: Read it