Home
   Today's News
   8000 Meters Facts
  
Banners Ads
   Bookstore
   Classified Ads
   Climb for Peace
  
Contact

   Downloads
  
Educational
  
Expeditions
  
Facts
  
Games
  
Gear
  
History
  
Interviews

   Mailing List
   Media

   Medical
  
News (current)
   News Archives
   Sat Phones
   Search
   Seven Summits
   Snowboard
   Speakers
   Students
   Readers Guide
   Risks

   Trip Reports
   Visitor Agreement

   Volunteer/help

 

    
  

 

  




 New photographs of glaciers in the Mt. Everest region of Nepal, when compared with old photographs of the same locations show a world of melting glaciers and changing landscapes.


New photographs of glaciers in the Mt. Everest region of Nepal, when compared with old photographs of the same locations show a world of melting glaciers and changing landscapes. They can also give practical insights and tools for adapting to these changes.

So says Dr. Alton Byers, Director of Research and Education at The Mountain Institute Byers returned Monday from a 30 day expedition in the Mt. Everest region retracing the steps of explorers from a half century ago. He re-photographed the 1955 glacier and landscape photos of Swiss glaciologist Fritz Müller and Austrian climber/cartographer Erwin Schneider. Muller spent eight months above 5,000 meters conducting his research on the slopes of Mount Everest. Schneider, Austria's top alpinist in the 1930s, launched numerous cartographic expeditions to the region between 1955 and 1961 that resulted in the beautiful Alpenvereinskarte maps. Each took hundreds of photographs and panoramas of the region's glaciers and high altitude landscapes.

"This is the first time that their photographs have been replicated, and they give us an on-the-ground experience of climate change in the Everest region during the past 60 years," says Byers, who lived in the Everest region for a year in the 1980s conducting his doctorate research. "Many small (less than .5 km2), "clean type" glaciers at the lower altitudes are now gone. Many larger ones have receded by half, and debris covered glaciers have visibly lost mass even though they've been insulated by boulders and soil." One set of photographs shows the Imja glacier, next to the popular Island Peak, as it appeared in 1955--now replaced with a 1 km2, 45 m deep lake that local people worry could break through its unconsolidated morainal dam at any time.

But viewing the glaciers through the eyes of the earlier mountaineer/scientists also gave Byers some new insights on how to identify, understand, and adapt to the changes related to warming, even on the world's highest mountain.

"Many statements have been made about climate change impacts in the Everest region in recent years based entirely on anecdotal evidence and popular theories," he says. "Like the work of Müller and Schneider, we now need more on-the-ground field studies by mountain geographers, anthropologists, glaciologists, and social scientists. By combining this with the superb remote sensing and computer modeling work that's been done, the two can enable us to identify the real threats, and the ways in which local people can adapt and reduce their vulnerabilities to change."

"Governments need to put mountains firmly back on the climate change agenda," he adds. "Millions and millions of people depend on mountains for their fresh water, power, natural and other resources, and we need to have thorough, fact-based understandings of how these resources may be effected by climate change before prescribing solutions." Through these studies, he says, local leaders, governments, and policy makers can gain better options for responding to the changes.

 
A cold weather, high altitude double boot for extreme conditions The Olympus Mons is the perfect choice for 8000-meter peaks. This super lightweight double boot has a PE thermal insulating inner boot that is coupled with a thermo-reflective outer boot with an integrated gaiter. We used a super insulating lightweight PE outsole to keep the weight down and the TPU midsole is excellent for crampon compatibility and stability on steep terrain. WEIGHT: 39.86 oz • 1130 g LAST: Olympus Mons CONSTRUCTION: Inner: Slip lasted Outer: Board Lasted OUTER BOOT: Cordura® upper lined with dual-density PE micro-cellular thermal insulating closed cell foam and thermo-reflective aluminium facing/ Insulated removable footbed/ Vibram® rubber rand See more here.

 






 

   Ascenders

   Atlas snowshoes

   Atomic

   Big Agnes

   Black Diamond

   Brunton

   Carabiners

   Chaco

   Cloudveil

   Columbia
  
CMI

   Crampons

   Edelweiss ropes
  
Eureka Tents

   Exofficio

   FiveTen

   Featured

   FoxRiver

   Gregory

   Granite Gear

   Harnesses
  
Headlamps

   Hestra
  
Helmets

   Helly Hansen

   HighGear

   HornyToad
  
Ice Axes

   Julbo

   Kavu Eyewear

   Katadyn

   Kelty

   Kong

   Lekisport

   Life is Good

   Lowa

   Lowe Alpine

   Lowepro

   Millet

   Motorola

   Mountain Hardwear

   Mountainsmith

   MSR

   Nalgene

   New England Ropes

   Nikwax

   Omega

   Osprey

   Outdoor Research
  
Patagonia

   Pelican

   Petzl

   Prana

   Princeton Tec

   Primus

   Rope Bags

   Royal Robbins

   Salomon

   Scarpa

   Scott

   Seattle Sports

   Serius
  
Sleeping Bags

   Sterling Rope

   Stubai

   Suunto

   Tents

   Teva

   Thermarest

   Trango

   Tool Logic

   Trekking Poles
  
Yaktrax
  
and more here

 



Send email to     •   Copyright© 1998-2005 EverestNews.com
All rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
Disclaimer, Privacy Policy, Visitor Agreement, Legal Notes: Read it