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  Johan Frankelius Mount Everest summit photo show 


On May 25, 2006, at 7.54am (Nepali time), Johan Frankelius topped out on Mount Everest (8850m; 29,035ft) from the north side via the North Col/Northeast Ridge route. Johan's group of six western climbers (US, UK, and Sweden) commenced their summit push from Advanced Base Camp (ABC) at 6400 meters (21,000ft) on the 22nd and arrived at the North Col (Camp 1, 7010m; 23,000ft) a few hours later that day. During the following two days the group moved up to Camp 2 and Camp 3, at 7600 (24,930ft) and 8260 meters (27,100ft) respectively, via the North Ridge. From High Camp (Camp 3), about half an hour before midnight, the climbing party started to climb the fairly steep rocky path up to the Northeast Ridge proper. Armed with head torches, ice axes and oxygen apparatus adjusted to deliver 2–3 liters of oxygen per minute, they continued to climb upward, along the NE Ridge, toward the summit pyramid. Flashes of lightning were seen in the lower western flanks and valleys of the Everest massif, a sign that the monsoon is nearing the mountain. By the time they had surmounted the notorious Second Step at 8610 meters (28,250ft), the summit pyramid of Everest revealed itself in full flush of the alpenglow. Continuing up the ridge and pyramid, they all topped out within three and a half hours. In the meantime the sun was rising above Makalu, a lofty pinnacle some 20 kilometers (12 miles) to the southeast.

On the summit Johan Frankelius planted various items such as flags, collected snow in plastic test tubes, and most importantly, with his camera recorded the awesomely impressive mountain scenery, e.g. Kangchenjunga (8586m; 28,169ft) to the east, Makalu (8467m; 27,779ft) and Barun Valley to the southeast, Lhotse (8501m, 27,890ft) to the south, and Cho Oyu (8201m; 26,906ft) to the west. Together with other Everest summiteers, Johan spent a total of fifty minutes on the summit, save for the last two or three which he spent alone taking the last shots, before he headed down to Camp 2 and, the next day, ABC, which is situated on the East Rongbuk Glacier, in Tibet.

Johan Frankelius on the summit of Mount Everest at 8.30am on May 25, 2006.

Sentinel to Johan, world's 5th highest peak, Makalu (8467m; 27,779ft); far right, Barun Valley (in Nepal); left of One Sport boot, 19 kilometers (12 miles) to the east-southeast, Chomo-Lonzo Central (7540m; 24,738ft) and just below C-L C, Chomo-Lonzo NW (7199m; 23,619ft). In the distance, to the left, 120 kilometers (75 miles) to the east-southeast, looms the 3rd highest mountain in the world, Kangchenjunga (8586m; 28,169ft). Twins (main, 7350m; 24,114ft) is seen to the left of (north of) Kangchenjunga. Elbow just blocks off the summit of Jannu, world's 32nd highest peak (7710m; 25,295ft), some 8 kilometers (5 miles) to the west of Kangchenjunga. Prayer flags inscribed with mantra have been planted on the summit (bottom left). Part of oxygen mask is visible above Charlet Moser piolet; hose leads into 45 L backpack lain on the summit. Photo: Mindu Chiri Sherpa (with Johan's camera); Canon EF 1:1.8, f=50mm/Fuji Velvia 100 

The summit of Mount Everest (8850m; 29.035ft) seen from the Northeast Ridge, in Tibet, on May 25, 2006.

It is 7.45am and the “peopled” summit is within reach. Only ten more minutes of the ascent remain before the photographer, too, tops out on the highest pinnacle on Earth. The steep upper Kangchung Face (East Face), center, plunges toward the Kangchung Glacier some 3.3 kilometers (2 miles) below. No one has yet climbed “East Face Direct”, i.e. reached the top of Everest from the foot of Lowe's Buttress (also known as the American Buttress) close to the Kangchung Glacier, in Tibet, at 5500 meters (18,045ft), via the red prayer flag (centre, right). Is “EFD” perhaps unclimbable? The cornices behind the summit (center and left) belong to the Southeast Ridge, which forms the border between Nepal and China (Tibet). SE Ridge stretches to the South Col (world's highest saddle/pass, not seen here), which separates Everest from Lhotse. The snow-capped summit is adorned with Buddhist prayer flags, half-buried in snow, planted by summiteers from previous expeditions. In the far distance, about 150 kilometers (93 miles) to the south, is the mist-covered Terai, in Nepal (far left, above the last cornice).

Photo: Johan Frankelius; Canon EF 1:1.8, f=50mm/Fuji Provia 400 

Looking south into Nepal from the summit of Mount Everest at around 8.20am (Nepali time) on May 25, 2006.

The Southeast Ridge and the Everest South Side trail leading up to the summit is seen in the foreground, including one (tiny) climber on a cornice just below the Hillary Step (8763m; 28,750ft) about 200 meters (656ft) away. Lhotse (8501m; 27,890ft), the forth highest mountain in the world, with its couloir leading up to the summit, towers to the left, 3 kilometers (1.9 miles) to the SSE.

Behind Lhotse, 24 kilometers (15 miles) away, is Chamlang (7319m; 24,012ft), Hunku Valley (center), and, 23 kilometers (14 miles) to the south, Peak 41 (6623m; 21,729ft), a rather

peaked mountain to the right of Honku Valley. In the distance, 11 kilometers (6.8 miles) to the south of Peak 41 rises Naulekh (6363m; 20,876ft). The snow covered and rather flat peak to the right and 32 kilometers (20 miles) to the SSE is Mera (6461m; 21,198ft), the highest so-called trekking peak in the Everest region.

Photo: Johan Frankelius; Canon EF 1:1.8, f=50mm/Fuji Velvia 100

 
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