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  Lei Wang to Become the First Chinese Woman to Climb the Seven Summits— and Ski the North and South Pole


 

Lei Wang is an American citizen now living in Boston currently training for a 2010 expedition to Mt. Everest, the world’s tallest mountain. If she successfully summits Everest, she’ll become the first Chinese woman, as well as the first Asian-American woman, to climb the Seven Summits. She has also already reached the North and South Poles, which can only be traversed by skiing through extreme conditions.

Lei Wang is an American citizen now living in Boston but born in China’s Jiang Su province. She is currently training for a 2010 expedition to Mt. Everest, the world’s tallest mountain. If she successfully summits Everest, she’ll become the first Chinese woman, as well as the first Asian-American woman, to climb the Seven Summits (Kilimanjaro, Denali, Elbrus, Aconcagua, Carstensz Pyramid, Vinson, and Everest). She has also already reached the North and South Poles, which can only be traversed by skiing through extreme conditions. Once Lei has climbed Everest, she’ll be one of only 10 people to have completed what’s referred to as the “7 + 2” challenge*.

In 2004, Lei was inspired to sacrifice a normal life and career to learn the technical skills and undertake the physical conditioning necessary to reach the highest mountains in the world. She has experienced a physical and ideological transformation, as well as many associated financial challenges, to reach this pinnacle.

Lei hopes that her example will inspire regular people to challenge themselves to do something they once considered impossible. She especially hopes to inspire Chinese people, American immigrants, and women around the world to stretch beyond their limits.

About Lei Wang: A graduate of Tsinghua University in Beijing, Lei came to the US in 1995 to study computer science and later earned an MBA at the Wharton School. While at Wharton, Wang rediscovered her love of the outdoors, climbing her first glacier mountain, Cotopaxi in Ecuador (5,897m/19,347ft) and her first “big peak,” Kilimanjaro in Africa.

It was on the trip to Kilimanjaro that Wang discovered how weak she was. Of all of her classmates who took that trip, she was the weakest and slowest. When she returned, she decided to improve her fitness and began running after work in the gym near her new home in Boston. She went on to run one half marathon and two full marathons later that year.

In February of 2004 Wang saw Touching the Void, a documentary movie about a first ascent of a peak in Peru that nearly ended in tragedy. Later that year she saw Women of K2, a documentary about women climbers of the harshest mountain on the planet. The next day she checked out every movie in the Boston Public Library on Everest and watched them all in one day. It was at that point that she decided she would climb Everest, and after more research, she decided that she would do all of the Seven Summits—the highest peak on each of the seven continents.

She has now climbed six of the Seven Summits: Kilimanjaro (July 2003), Elbrus (Aug 2005), Denali (June 2007), Carstensz Pyramid (Nov 2007), Vinson (Dec 2007), Aconcagua (Jan 2008). She has also skied to the North Pole (Apr 2008) and the South Pole (Jan 2008). With only Mt. Everest left, she is well on her way to becoming the first Chinese woman to accomplish this feat.

About the Seven Summits
The Seven Summits—Kilimanjaro, Denali, Elbrus, Aconcagua, Carstensz Pyramid, Vinson, and Everest—are the highest peaks on each of the seven continents.

Millet One Sport Everest Boot  has made some minor changes by adding more Kevlar. USES Expeditions / High altitude / Mountaineering in extremely cold conditions / Isothermal to -75°F Gore-Tex® Top dry / Evazote Reinforcements with aramid threads. Avg. Weight: 5 lbs 13 oz Sizes: 5 - 14 DESCRIPTION Boot with semi-rigid shell and built-in Gore-Tex® gaiter reinforced by aramid threads, and removable inner slipper Automatic crampon attachment Non-compressive fastening Double zip, so easier to put on Microcellular midsole to increase insulation Removable inner slipper in aluminized alveolate Fiberglass and carbon footbed Cordura + Evazote upper Elasticated collar.

Expedition footwear for mountaineering in conditions of extreme cold.  NOTE US SIZES LISTED. See more here.







 

 

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